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Restaurant Booth Cushion Manufacture

In the manufacture of a restaurant booth seat cushion, there is typically a wooden frame with a deck. Foam padding is then added to the deck. The booth seats that we build have the option of three types of decking styles: solid wood deck, webbed deck, and a metal spring deck. Each type of decking has a distinct feel and comfort. A restaurant's budget and seating needs will usually dictate which option is best.

Solid Platform Deck

Booth illustration with a solid deck

Above is a an illustration of a booth frame with a solid platform deck. Simple and inexpensive at the cost of comfort.

This is the least expensive option. Booths with solid platform decking can endure a lot of traffic without much maintenance or repair to the deck. There is a noticeable difference in comfort compared to a webbed or spring deck booth seat cushion. The solid platform decking does not have any reflex which makes the booth seat feel stiffer and perhaps, less comfortable to some.

Webbed Decking

Webbed booth deck enhancement

The webbing in the booth frame above is weaved to achieve a stronger platform and create better weight distribution. We added to the original webbing (in brown) to create a better deck platform.

Booth seat cushions with webbed decks are noticably more comfortable than booth seats with solid decks because they have more reflex when sat on, and distribute the weight more efficiently. Booths with webbed decks require more maintenance than solid platform decks. Over time, the webbing will become worn and stretched out, and the webbing on the booth seat will have to be replaced.

Spring Decking

Booth frame with the spring deck replacement

The springs being replaced above will be tied together to distribute the weight across the length of the cushion.



This is the most expensive and most comfortable booth seat decking option. Springs provide a more dynamic reflex than either solid platform or webbed decks. The springs on the booth seat are hand-tied together so that pressure is spread out more evenly by making them all work together. Generally, springs will last longer than webbing if they are properly maintained.